Keep Us Reading Vonnegut

helllo there.
i haven’t written anthing real in weeks, now. so, i thought i’d update you on my english literature exercises to make up for lack of time and creativity.
after stumbling upon kurt vonnegut twice in one week (mentioned in “take the fall” by brendan james and another time in john green’s “looking for alaska”, both of which i liked), i decided to buy “slaughterhouse five”, a story which happens to deal with the bombing of my hometown in wwII and is supposed to be simultaneously funny and sad, according to … let me check … the new york times, life, the atlantic monthly …and the new york times, again.
i’m between pages 62 and 63, now, and all i have read was really (!) confusing and disturbing, gory matter – jammed into a tumble-dryer to just destroy the links between each and every information provided. but holding a book in my hands whose cover quotes graham greene declaring vonnegut “one of the best living american writers”, i’m quite afraid to say that personally, i didn’t like it very much, yet. some short passages are really beautiful, though, and “so it goes”.
all these great reviews make me wonder, whether i just don’t get the real, hidden greatness that seems so obvious to everyone else. however, there still are seven and a half parts to go, so there’s hope. please turn out to be a great book. i don’t want to have read all this “two-special-spikes-where-his-eyes-would-be”-stuff for nothing.

have you read it? how did you like it?
ps. here are two books i like to think of as both funny and tragic. one is called “the fault in our stars” and is written by john green, as well. and if you understand german well enough, “rocktage” by dana bönisch will serve the same purpose.

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Take The Fall

From amidst the darkness, he lifted his grievous carcass, walked the distance to the room’s only window pane and for the next minutes, he just stood there – sunken in faint moonlight. It was a picture of a broken man. A man, who longed for one more day of innocent childhood; a plea he knew he would never be granted. Continue reading